Thursday, April 17, 2014

The M-Word: Masturbation: A biblical perspective


This one’s about masturbation. You’ve been warned.
Is there a more awkward subject in all Christendom? Controversial, sure–but mostly it’s just not fun to talk about. Of all the sex issues, it’s the squirmiest.
And if we’re talking about getting God’s perspective on it, there’s just not much to go on. In the past, people have tried to translate certain verses–including, notoriously, the sin of Onan in Genesis 38:6-9–to refer to masturbation, but it’s quite a stretch. There’s no rule to scribble on a post-it note and slap on the bathroom mirror. I dig deeper. I engage the Bible.
- See more at: http://pvariel.com/the-m-word-masturbation-a-biblical-perspective/#sthash.of1cK944.dpuf

To Read More Please Click on the below link:


The M-Word: Masturbation: A biblical perspective

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Many Are Looking For A Little Bit Of Love

Many Are Looking For A Little Bit Of Love

Two letters moved our hearts.

One was from a woman who said she moved to a new neighborhood and had an urgent need in her family, so she contacted a Protestant church nearby and requested that someone visit them.

No one came, so she made a second request.  Still no one came.

However, one of her new neighbors learned of her problem and came to her help.  It happened the neighbor was involved in a false cult.  Because of the kindness shown to her the newcomer was drawn into the same cult.  She said years went by before she realized the error she was in and found deliverance through Christ.

The other letter was from a prison inmate. He said that one bitterly cold night he went to a rescue mission and asked for a place to sleep.  He was a “traveling man” (a wanderer) and had no home.  But because he had been drinking and had no I.D., he was refused a bed and turned out into the street.

Later he was sent to prison.  Since that time he has been saved, but he hasn't forgotten the bitterness he felt when the administrator denied him a bed that freezing night.

We don’t know what justifying circumstances there may have been to cause Christian people to act as they did in these two situations, but we do know there are many needy people around us who are looking for a little bit of love.

How is it with us?   Are we touched with the needs of others, or don’t we care?

If we don’t love men and women whom we can see, how can we say we love God whom we can’t see? (1 John 4:20).

It seems there are more lonely people in the world today than ever before.  Some are in hospitals or nursing homes.  Others live down the street.  They may be people we talk to in stores and offices, or work beside every day.  We may even find them in church.

Some churches display the sign, “The end of your search for a friendly church.”  This draws people, for they are looking for friendliness.  They don’t want to attend a church where no one notices them, no one shakes their hands, and no one invites them back.

A preacher visiting a city hospital was asked by one of the nurse to say a word to a sick man who was lying very still.

“With pleasure, Nurse,” he replied, “but he is asleep.”

“No, he is awake,” she said “but he is dying.”

The preacher read the card attached to the bed:  “Robert Browning—age 71—no friends.”

The preacher said, “Nurse, what does this mean?”

She answered, “Just what it says.  If he dies tonight, there’s no one to notify.  Do speak to him.”

So the preacher bent over the bed and quietly quoted, “How sweet the name of Jesus sounds in a believer’s ear.”

The closed eyes opened, and the man whispered very faintly, “Yes.  Jesus is my Savior my Friend.”

No one is friendless if he knows Jesus; but if Christians were more friendly, more people would know Him.

We are representatives of the best Friend a sinner ever had.  We may have the privilege of introducing people to that Friend by being a friend.

Let’s ask ourselves, 

“Do we really care?

Does God’s love really dwell in our hearts, or
do we only love in word, not in deed and in truth?”

                                                                  —R. C. Cunningham




NOTE:

From the archives of Confident Living Magazine 

Source:
Confident Living Magazine
Back to the Bible
R C CUnningham

The People Behind the curtain of  A to Z Challenge [2014]

Arlee Bird -The Founder: Tossing it Out

Alex J. Cavanaugh: Alex J. Cavanaugh
Stephen Tremp: Author Stephen Tremp
Tina Downey: Life is Good
Damyanti Biswas: Amlokiblogs
Jeremy Hawkins[Being Retro]
Nicole AyersThe Madlab Post
M. J. Joachim: M. J. Joachim’s Writing Tips
Heather M. Gardner: The Waiting is the Hardest Part
AJ Lauer: Naturally Sweet
Pam Margolis: An Unconventional Librarian


Tuesday, April 15, 2014

The M-Word: Masturbation: A biblical Perspective

Pic. Credit: new.exchristian.net
This one’s about masturbation. You’ve been warned.
Is there a more awkward subject in all Christendom? Controversial, sure–but mostly it’s just not fun to talk about. Of all the sex issues, it’s the squirmiest.
And if we’re talking about getting God’s perspective on it, there’s just not much to go on. In the past, people have tried to translate certain verses–including, notoriously, the sin of Onan in Genesis 38:6-9–to refer to masturbation, but it’s quite a stretch. There’s no rule to scribble on a post-it note and slap on the bathroom mirror. I dig deeper. I engage the Bible.
- See more at: 
The M-Word: Masturbation: A biblical perspective

Source:
Philipscom

Monday, April 14, 2014

L for Laban


L for Laban
(Cheating)

www.heyuguys.co.uk
When I was a teenager our high school math teacher bought the farm next to ours. He didn't know much about farming, but he know a lot about dishonesty.  He hired me to help him get his hay in one year, promising me a fair wage.  But when the job was finished, he told me had no money.  I had been cheated.

NAME: “White”
DATE:  20th  Century BC
IDENTIFICATIONS: Son of Bethuel, brother of Rebekah, father of Leah and Rachel
STORY LINE: Laban schemed to get more years of service from Jacob
READ IT IN THE BIBLE:  Genesis 29:1-30

Jacob must have felt the same way.  When he fled to Haran to escape the hatred of his brother, Esau, he hired on with Laban, his uncle.  His partseven years of hard labor.
The paybackthe hand of Rachel, Laban's daughter, in marriage.  Jacob was so in love with Rachel it seemed like a good deal.

But when it came time to pay up, Laban switched his older daughter, Leah, as Jacob's wife.  Jacob was outraged.  He had been cheated.  He had to work another seven years for Rachel.  In all, Jacob worked twenty years for Laban and finally decided he had had enough.  He took his family and headed home to Canaan.  But Laban soon overtook Jacob. After some words, Jacob and Laban erected a small heap of stones as mutual testimony they would never again have any dealings with each other.  They repeated the Mizpeh benediction:  "May the Lord watches between you and me when we are absent one from another" (Genesis 31:49).  Usually a bond between friends, this became a pact between adversaries.

If your boss or brother-in-law or anybody else is cheating you today, ask God to give you strength to be honest with them, even if they aren't honest with you.  After all, God keeps good payroll records.


                                                                                 —Dr. Woodrow Kroll 

NOTE:
This post is posted as part of  A to Z Blog Challenge 2014 

Source: 
Back to the Bible Intl.
Confident Living Magazine
Pic. Credit: www.heyuguys.co.uk, Back to the Bible Intl.

The People Behind the curtain of  A to Z Challenge [2014]

Arlee Bird -The Founder: Tossing it Out

Alex J. Cavanaugh: Alex J. Cavanaugh
Stephen Tremp: Author Stephen Tremp
Tina Downey: Life is Good
Damyanti Biswas: Amlokiblogs
Jeremy Hawkins[Being Retro]
Nicole AyersThe Madlab Post
M. J. Joachim: M. J. Joachim’s Writing Tips
Heather M. Gardner: The Waiting is the Hardest Part
AJ Lauer: Naturally Sweet
Pam Margolis: An Unconventional Librarian

Saturday, April 12, 2014

K is for Kings: What Do Kings Need?

What Do Kings Need?

Pic. Credit: A to Z Blog Challenge 14 
Kings have everything.

If you were a king, what would you rejoice in the most?

In what did David rejoice?

Psalm 21 tells us what it means to be a king—not just for a day but for a lifetime.

We are kings because we are God’s children.  Jesus Christ has made us kings and priests because He loves us and washed away our sins in His blood.  Today, God wants us to reign in life.  We are on the throne with the Lord Jesus.  “The king shall have joy in Your strength, O Lord” (v.1).  David is rejoicing in the strength that God gave him—strength to walk and strength to war; strength to build and strength to battle; strength to carry the burdens of life.  Are you rejoicing today as God’s king because He give you strength?

David continues, “And in Your salvation how greatly shall he rejoice!” (v.1). He rejoices in God’s salvation. We need to do the same.  One day Jesus told His disciples, “Don’t rejoice because the demons are subject to you.  Rejoice because your names are written down in heaven” (Luke 10:20).

David also rejoices in satisfaction. “You have given him his heart’s desire, and have not withheld the request of his lips.  For You meet him with the blessings of goodness” (vv. 2, 3).  If we look back, we will find goodness and mercy following us (23:6), and if we look ahead, God is meeting us with His goodness (v.3).  Don’t be afraid of today, and don’t be afraid of the future.  God will meet you with His goodness. 

In verse 7 David rejoices in stability:  “For the king trust in the Lord, and through the mercy of the Most High he shall not be moved.”  I like this blessings we can rejoice in—God’s strength, salvation, satisfaction and stability.  All of this is for God’s glory.  “His glory is greater in Your salvation (v.5). 

Warren W.  Wiersbe
Many Christians fail to see themselves as kings.  But god wants us to reign in life and has provided several blessings that enable us to live as kings.  Are you enjoying the blessings of kingship?  If not, claim His blessings and start living a life of victory.  

—Warren W. Wiersbe
(Former General Director and Bible Teacher for Back to the Bible)


This post is posted as part of  A to Z Blog Challenge 2014 

Source: 
Back to the Bible Intl.
Confident Living Magazine
Pic. Credit: A to Z Blog Challenge 2014, Back to the Bible Intl.

The People Behind the curtain of  A to Z Challenge [2014]

Arlee Bird -The Founder: Tossing it Out

Alex J. Cavanaugh: Alex J. Cavanaugh
Stephen Tremp: Author Stephen Tremp
Tina Downey: Life is Good
Damyanti Biswas: Amlokiblogs
Jeremy Hawkins[Being Retro]
Nicole AyersThe Madlab Post
M. J. Joachim: M. J. Joachim’s Writing Tips
Heather M. Gardner: The Waiting is the Hardest Part
AJ Lauer: Naturally Sweet
Pam Margolis: An Unconventional Librarian

Friday, April 11, 2014

J for James (Staying at Home) Dr. Kroll Writes......

James
Staying at Home 

Pic. Credit. A to Z Blog challenge 14
Dr. Woodrow Kroll
I grew up in the rolling hills of western Pennsylvania.  Nearby lived a simple, godly family named Hershey with five children.  One by one they left home to go to the mission field.  All but one, who stayed home to serve the Lord.
  
NAME: “Supplanter” ("Jacob” in Hebrew)

DATE: 1st Century AD

IDENTIFICATIONS: Oldest son of Mary and Joseph, author of the Book of James

STORY LINE: James was the oldest of Jesus' four younger brothers

READ IT IN THE BIBLE:  Matthew 13:53-58; Acts 15:1-21

Not all of God's servants are called to leave home in answer to God's call.  When Isaiah said, "Here am I! Send me," God sent him to his own people in his own land (Isaiah 6:8-9).  And when the demoniac of Gadara wanted to go with Jesus after the Savior healed him, Christ told him to go home and tell his friends what the Lord had done for him (Mark 5:19).
  
While Thomas was going to India, Philip to Asia Minor, and Paul to the rest of the Roman world, someone had to remain behind in Jerusalem to faithfully lead the flock there.  That someone as James, the younger brother of the Lord Jesus.

Like the rest of Jesus' brothers, James did not come to faith in Jesus until after His crucifixion.  But in the Book of Acts James emerged as a leader of Jerusalem church.  His younger brothers also became believers and traveled to foreign places (1 Corinthians 9:5), but James knew the home front was his mission field (Galatians 2:9).

If you long for a passport filled with stamps from foreign countries, but instead you just have a class of junior high boys, be encouraged by James.  It was his junior high boys who were the next generation of those sent out to capture the world for Christ.  Your home job is important.  Be proud of it. CL

This post is posted as part of  A to Z Blog Challenge 2014 

Source: 
Back to the Bible Intl.
Confident Living Magazine
Pic. Credit: A to Z Blog Page/ Back to the Bible Int.


The People Behind the curtain of  A to Z Challenge [2014]

Arlee Bird -The Founder: Tossing it Out

Alex J. Cavanaugh: Alex J. Cavanaugh
Stephen Tremp: Author Stephen Tremp
Tina Downey: Life is Good
Damyanti Biswas: Amlokiblogs
Jeremy Hawkins[Being Retro]
Nicole AyersThe Madlab Post
M. J. Joachim: M. J. Joachim’s Writing Tips
Heather M. Gardner: The Waiting is the Hardest Part
AJ Lauer: Naturally Sweet
Pam Margolis: An Unconventional Librarian


Thursday, April 10, 2014

I For Ittai - Woodrow Kroll Writes....

I For Ittai
An Unlikely Alliance

Pic. From Freedownload
The Lone Ranger had Tonto, and unlikely companion.
Sherlock Holmes had Watson, a complete mismatch.
David had Ittai the Gittite, one of the most unlikely friendships ever.


NAME: “Timely”

DATE: 10th Century BC

IDENTIFICATIONS: Man from Gath who accompanied David in flight

STORY LINE: Ittai came to Jerusalem as Absalom drove David out

READ IT IN THE BIBLE:  2 Samuel 15:13-22; 18:1-5

Goliath of Gath was no match for the shepherd boy and his sling, but when David became king, he had more giant-sized problems to deal with.  At one point, David's son Absalom rebelled against his father, and David had to flee from Jerusalem.  Among those who fled with him as Ittai the Gittite.

When David saw that Ittai was in his entourage he suggested the Gittite return to Jerusalem.  No one would blame him if he did.  Ittai wasn't Jewish.  He wasn't member of the king's household.  Besides, he had only arrived in Jerusalem the day before Absalom's rebellion.  What horrible timing.

But Ittai refused, saying that he wanted to go wherever David went.  The reason this alliance is so unlikely is that Ittai was a Gittite.  Do you know what you call natives of the city of Gath, where Goliath lived?  You guessed it.  Gittites.  After the rebellion was thwarted, David made Ittai commander over one third of his armies.

This is one of the most unlikely alliances in history.  Still, it shows that it doesn't matter who you are, what your nationality or ethnic background is, if you want to enjoy the blessing of God, you need to hang out with the people of God.

Enjoy the fellowship of those whose skin color is different form yours or whose denomination is different from yours.  You may just discover that one of your most faithful fiends will also be one of your unlikely fiends.

                  —Dr. Woodrow Kroll
              (Former President and Bible Teacher, Back to the Bible)



Source: 
Back to the Bible Intl.
Dr. Woodrow Kroll
Confident Living Magazine
Pic. Credit: colourbox.com/ A to Z Blog Challenge 2014
This post is posted as part of  A to Z Blog Challenge 2014